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MVR Ascend Will Allow you to Play any First-Person Shooter From Xbox or PlayStation in Virtual Reality

VRFocus talks with Sachin Patel, managing director of MVR Global, about their latest venture into creating a head-mounted display (HMD) for the mid-ranged virtual reality (VR) market. With MVR Ascend you will be able to play any of your favourite first-person (FPS) AAA videogame titles from PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

Patel explains that consumers have the option of either purchasing high end HMD’s such as the HTC Vive or Oculus Rift that are often above people’s budgets, are tethered or cheap HMD’s with limited smartphone functionality. Both ranges of HMD’s however do not include high-end AAA videogame title’s equivalent to the Grand Theft Auto or Call of Duty franchises.

The team at MVR Global believe they have the solution to the lack of AAA titles for VR. They’ve designed a sensor that mimics the right analogue stick on an Xbox One or PlayStation 4 controller, so the sensor replaces that ‘head look’ action (the action of looking left or right). Place this sensor on the back of a HMD and you are able to look left and right in-game with the MVR Ascend, instead of using the analogue stick. In other words, the sensor allows for head-tracking in VR. With a simple push of the left trigger on either controller you’re also able to stop head-tracking and put the control back into the right analogue stick in order to make precision shots during scoped views. This means for those close quarter moments and you want to start shooting like you normally would – you’re able to without using your head and potentially feeling nauseous.

Additionally you have the option of choosing to play the videogame in 2D or 3D with interchangeable lenses that come with the headset. Patel believes that most people would only want to play 3D VR videogames for 30-45 min before it starts to get uncomfortable; that playing the videogame in 2D is comfortable for long sessions of playing in VR. Other technical aspects of the MVR Ascend are a single wire that connects from the controller to the sensor, meaning that you will not trip over wires walking around and it would allow you freedom of movement when gaming; a small screen at the back of the controller will show you different available titles you can set the HMD and controllers to, and to make further adjustments you can hook up the MVR Ascend to a computer to modify them manually.

Patel explains that this is perfect for large gaming companies as well as indie videogame developers. Instead of dedicating a whole team to make their videogame VR compatible, they just need to add support for MVR Ascend’s sensor and controllers as well as making a videogame include compatibility for stereoscopic 3D via a split-screen. If MVR Global manage to get their product to market, it could mean a great deal for videogame developers and for consumers alike. It would make VR more affordable, offer gamers to play their favourite AAA titles from both Xbox One and PlayStation 4.

Watch the video below to find out more about MVR Ascend, various prices, how to set it up and much more.