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Life In 360°: A Final Three From Venice

We conclude our trinity of Life In 360° Friday posts covering the Biennale di Venezia, otherwise known as the Venice Biennale with the final three videos of YouTube channel Artsy’s “Inside the Biennale” series today.

Over the previous two weeks we’ve looked at dance, performance art, music – or certainly the art of sound, sculpture – in two very different styles and the history of the event which dates all the way back to the 19th century. For today’s three items we look at sculpture and the power of illusion, musical improvisation, and finally Artsy take to the grounds to ask the public for their favourite installations.

As before the three 360 degree videos are below each with their descriptions.

 

7 – Women of Venice

“From her Brooklyn studio in a former brick factory, sculptor Carol Bove maneuvers a colossal ceiling gantry to piece together her commanding, albeit delicate sculptures. “The power of illusion is one of the things I get the most excited about,” she says. “I return to this idea a lot of the time of the heavy material appearing to be light.…I’m getting off the ground by starting in the air.” Evoking the work of 20th-century Abstract Expressionist sculptors like Mark di Suvero and John Chamberlain, Bove’s large-scale, often site-specific creations have garnered international renown in recent years.”

8 – Viva Arte Viva

“Enter “Viva Arte Viva” on any given day, and you’ll come across Kasper making art, performing music with friends, interacting with exhibition visitors, or meditating—thereby providing a window into the sometimes mystifying, and often mythologized, life and work of an artist. “It’s like having permanent house guests for six months,” says Kasper. “But I’m not in my own home, and there’s all different kinds of people from all over the world that appreciate that I don’t necessarily have an endgame here—but let’s have fun along the way.””

9 – People’s Choice

“In the concluding episode of “Inside the Biennale,” we ask visitors from around the world to name their favorite artworks and pavilions across Venice—and reflect on the significance of the age-old exhibition. Some were drawn by the emotional force of a work; others by the immersive experience of a live performance. While some identified the importance of the Biennale as a platform for artists, others recognized the opportunity for collective reflection and discussion on the state of contemporary art, as well as the unifying power of art as a universal language.

The answers to these questions vary based on the individual, revealing that while the Biennale is the most important exhibition on the art calendar—and has influence beyond the art world—it’s also a very personal experience.” 

Life In 360° will be back on VRFocus Monday, be sure to stick around in the meantime though for all manner of things VR.